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Showing 9 of 132 Results in Net Neutrality

Net Neutrality Is a Solution in Search of a Hypothetical Problem

Popular Media The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has issued a new proposed rule that would impose far-reaching regulations on large internet service providers like AT&T, Comcast, and . . .

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has issued a new proposed rule that would impose far-reaching regulations on large internet service providers like AT&T, Comcast, and Verizon. These “net neutrality” rules would reclassify broadband internet access as a telecommunications service subject to common-carrier regulations under Title II of the Communications Act.

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Telecommunications & Regulated Utilities

How ETNO’s ‘Fair Share’ Proposal Threatens Europe’s Digital Future:

TOTM The digital transformation of Europe—and, indeed, the world—has been a defining theme of the 21st century. As with all significant shifts, it has also come . . .

The digital transformation of Europe—and, indeed, the world—has been a defining theme of the 21st century. As with all significant shifts, it has also come with its share of challenges, opportunities, and controversies. 

One such controversy that has recently reemerged is the so-called “fair share” proposal for network traffic—championed most recently in a statement from the European Telecommunications Network Operators’ Association (ETNO)—under which the major tech platforms would be made to finance improvements to EU telecom networks. While ostensibly a call for regulatory change, the deeper one delves, the more evident it becomes that ETNO’s proposal is less about fairness and more a strategic play for legacy telecoms to tap into the vast revenues of major content producers.

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Telecommunications & Regulated Utilities

Net Neutrality Is Dead, Long Live National Security

TOTM Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chair Jessica Rosenworcel announced plans last week for the commission to vote Oct. 19 on whether to take the first steps toward . . .

Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chair Jessica Rosenworcel announced plans last week for the commission to vote Oct. 19 on whether to take the first steps toward reinstating Title II regulations on broadband providers. Two days later, the FCC issued a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) for the Safeguarding and Securing the Open Internet (SSOI) order.

If adopted, the new rules would revive much of the Open Internet Order (OIO) the commission passed in 2015 under former FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler. That order classified broadband-internet service as a Title II telecommunications service under the Communications Act, treating many broadband services as public utilities. This allowed the FCC to impose common-carrier obligations on internet service providers (ISPs), including bans on blocking or throttling lawful content, paid prioritization of content, and other practices seen as contrary to so-called “net neutrality” principles.

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Telecommunications & Regulated Utilities

Net Neutrality II: Electric Boogaloo—Rate Regulation Hiding in Plain Sight

TOTM Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chair Jessica Rosenworcel on Tuesday announced the agency’s proposal to regulate internet services under Title II of the Communications Act. Commonly referred . . .

Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chair Jessica Rosenworcel on Tuesday announced the agency’s proposal to regulate internet services under Title II of the Communications Act. Commonly referred to as “net neutrality,” the chair plans to release proposed rules today, with a vote scheduled for Oct. 19 to begin the rulemaking process.

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Telecommunications & Regulated Utilities

Gomez Confirmed to FCC: Here Comes Net Neutrality, But First…

TOTM The U.S. Senate moved yesterday in a 55-43 vote to confirm Anna Gomez to the Federal Communications Commission. Her confirmation breaks a partisan deadlock at . . .

The U.S. Senate moved yesterday in a 55-43 vote to confirm Anna Gomez to the Federal Communications Commission. Her confirmation breaks a partisan deadlock at the agency that has been in place since the beginning of the Biden administration, when Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel vacated her seat to become FCC chair.

The commission now has a 3-2 Democratic majority. With the new majority, many speculate that the FCC will push to bring back net neutrality, which President Joe Biden supports. The president’s July 9, 2021 executive order specifically “encouraged” the FCC to “[r]estore Net Neutrality rules undone by the prior administration.” Deadline reminds us that Gomez served as counselor to Obama-era FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler, when the commission voted to reclassify broadband service under the banner of net neutrality.

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Telecommunications & Regulated Utilities

Network Slicing and Net Neutrality

Scholarship Abstract Whether network slicing complies with the net neutrality rules currently in force in Europe and previously applicable in the U.S. presents a key issue . . .

Abstract

Whether network slicing complies with the net neutrality rules currently in force in Europe and previously applicable in the U.S. presents a key issue in the deployment of 5G. In many ways, both regimes frame the issues in a similar manner, with the exceptions for reasonable traffic management and specialized services likely to play the most important roles. Both regimes also focus on similar considerations, including the requirement that measures be based on technical rather than business considerations and the distinction between measures aimed at improving the performance of the entire network or specific applications, although both distinctions are problematic in some respects. Both regimes also emphasize application agnosticism and end-user choice, with European law finding the former implicit in the latter. At the same time, European and U.S. law reflect some key differences: the regimes cover different types of entities, frame the issues in terms of nondiscrimination versus throttling and paid prioritization, take different positions on whether measures must be limited to temporary or exceptional circumstances, and place different weight on the impact of the rules on investment and on the relevance industry standards. The relatively undeveloped state of both legal regimes means that the ultimate answer must await enforcement decisions and actions by NRAs, and any subsequent judicial challenges to these decisions.

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Telecommunications & Regulated Utilities

Two FCC Commissioners Walk Into a Bar 

TOTM Grab a partner, find a group, and square up for Truth on the Market’s second Telecom Hootenanny. We’ve got spectrum auctions, broadband subsidies, and a . . .

Grab a partner, find a group, and square up for Truth on the Market’s second Telecom Hootenanny. We’ve got spectrum auctions, broadband subsidies, and a European 5G tango.

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Telecommunications & Regulated Utilities

There’s Nothing ‘Fair’ About EU Telecoms’ Proposed ‘Fair Share’ Plan

TOTM The European Commission’s recently concluded consultation on “the future of the electronic communications sector and its infrastructure” was a curious phenomenon in which the commission . . .

The European Commission’s recently concluded consultation on “the future of the electronic communications sector and its infrastructure” was a curious phenomenon in which the commission revived the seemingly dead-and-buried idea of a legally mandated “sender pays” network-traffic scheme, despite the fact that it remains as unpopular and discredited as it was when last discussed roughly a decade ago.

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Telecommunications & Regulated Utilities

Senate Should Press Biden FCC Nominee on Rate Regulation

Popular Media President Joe Biden’s big plans for the Federal Communications Commission, including the reimposition of so-called “net neutrality” rules that were rolled back during the Trump . . .

President Joe Biden’s big plans for the Federal Communications Commission, including the reimposition of so-called “net neutrality” rules that were rolled back during the Trump years, may finally move forward if the U.S. Senate agrees to confirm Biden’s recent nominee Anna Gomez to be the commission’s fifth member and decisive vote.

A history of support for net neutrality was one of the things that ultimately doomed the confirmation prospects for prior nominee Gigi Sohn, who withdrew her name in February, 16 months after Biden originally nominated her. Senators are sure to press Gomez for her thoughts on the same issue, as they should, but it’s not the only matter deserving of scrutiny. As policymakers continue to explore ways to expand affordable internet access, they should also determine where Gomez stands on the key issue of rate regulation.

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Telecommunications & Regulated Utilities